Category Archives: NY

I finally found a rich relative among my mottley crew of ancestors. . .sort of . . .

Most of my ancestors were poorer than dirt . . .and few made it past elementary school.

My sister, who shares my interest in genealogy, and I are trying to find another Revolutionary Patriot. We are obviously in D.A.R. We’ve been researching Margaret Brinkerhoff. She was the daughter of Hendrick Brinkerhoff and Annetje Vreeland. Margaret was born in New Jersey in approximately 1787. She somehow met and ran off with William Wallace and they were married in Trinity Church, an Episcopalian Parish, in 1801. Her family were all members of the Dutch Reformed Church and this may have caused a family rift. If you have visited the site of the World Trade Center Towers or visited the Wall Street area, that is the church they were married in.

Trinity Church Parish

Trinity Church Parish

This old postcard is not of the original church. The original church was destroyed in a fire, which started in the Fighting Cocks Tavern and destroyed nearly 500 buildings and houses and left thousands of New Yorkers homeless. Six days later, most of the city’s volunteer firemen followed General Washington north.

But back to my relatives. When you hit a brick wall in genealogy, you go back and try researching lesser players, i.e., children of the people you are researching and their relatives. I was searching obituaries today on genealogybank.com to see if I could find out more about Margaret Brinkerhoff and William Wallace.

One of their daughters, Mary Wallace, married Isaac Lewis. Mary Wallace was born in 1810 in New York City and Isaac Lewis was born in 1807 in Stratford, Connecticut. Mary died on 17 Nov 1891. Isaac Lewis died on 2 Feb 1892.

But, wow! When I started reading his obituary and finding newspaper articles about him, I saw that he was an extremely wealthy man. OK. . .OK, I confess, he isn’t exactly a relative, but he was the husband of my third great aunt on the Wallace side. So I actually still have struck out on having any wealthy ancestors and only have inebriates, coal miners and the slightly deranged. Sigh.

Obituary of Isaac Lewis, printed in the New York Tribune on Friday, February 5, 1892.

Obituary of Isaac Lewis, printed in the New York Tribune on Friday, February 5, 1892.

Obituary from The New York Times

Obituary from The New York Times

Below is what can be found now at 107 East 13th Street, NY, NY. This address was printed in his obituary.

What is Now at 107 East 13th Street, NY, NY

What is Now at 107 East 13th Street, NY, NY

After I found the obituary for Isaac, I found a notice of the sale of his real estate. “The following private sale is reported: Ascher Weinstein has bought nos. 105 and 107 East Fifteenth St. between Union Square and Irving Place. . . .This is part of the estate of Isaac Lewis”

Real Estate, Business at the Exchanges.  Printed in the New York Tribune on Tuesday, November 22, 1892.

Real Estate, Business at the Exchanges. Printed in the New York Tribune on Tuesday, November 22, 1892.

This area is now part of New York University (NYU), and 107 East 15th Street is where the The Lee Strasberg Theatre & Film Institute is located. And all of this is near my very favorite book store in the entire world — The Strand, which is located at 828 East 12th Street, NYC. No visit to NYC is complete without a trip to The Strand.

105 East 15th Street, NY, NY

105 East 15th Street, NY, NY

107 East 15th Street, NY, NY

107 East 15th Street, NY, NY

But it gets better. Isaac Lewis was a big investor in the “L”. It isn’t the “L” subway line that we know now, but a road to Brooklyn. My daughter and her husband bought their condo in Brooklyn precisely to be close to the “L” subway. The L subway is a straight shot into Manhattan. It is so much faster and easier than a car or a cab. And, voila!, you can get off right in Union Square (where Isaac Lewis lived) and visit The Strand.  And, even better, by living in Brooklyn, they get a tiny bit of outdoor space.  Which is a rare commodity in NYC and Brooklyn.

It kind of makes you wonder about DNA and retained genetic knowledge. I have loved The Strand since I first set foot in it. And my daughter loves the L so much that she moved close to a station in Brooklyn. Strange!

I am going to attach three parts of different articles detailing Isaac Lewis’ interest in the L and the bridges to Brooklyn. Please note that another gentleman named was Senator McCarren. He has a park named for him close to where my daughter and her family lives.

Contentions Resulting from the death of Isaac Lewis

Contentions Resulting from the death of Isaac Lewis

Information about the History of the L

Information about the History of the L

Description of Isaac Lewis's Investment

Description of Isaac Lewis’s Investment

L_train

Francis Woodruff Family

I remember trying to find family information before the internet, but it was a slow and arduous job. Now, with the internet, fast computers and the plethora of online documents — it is so pleasurable that it can become an addiction. I “met” the author of the blog titled “Chips Off the Old Block” online because we share many common ancestors. My Dickinson ancestors married into the Woodruff family (or vice versa). The Dickinson family is my link to the Mayflower. Rather than rewriting “Chips” blog post about Francis and Mary Jane Woodruff’s family, I am going to reblog it. Their daughter Emma married John W. Dickinson. I’ve written about John being a dentist in Brooklyn, NY, in an earlier post. And his father was a coroner in Williamsburgh (Williamsburg), NY. (please see earlier posts)

And More Kelley Photos!

Left:  Dr. Kelley Right: Dr. and Mrs. Kelley

Left: Dr. Kelley
Right: Dr. and Mrs. Kelley

Above right is a photo of Grandfather Kelley with Granny

Kelley family
The Kelley family — children Harriett, Margaret, Robert and Patricia

Virgil and Pat Moreland with baby John

Virgil and Pat Moreland with baby John

The Beginnings of the Moreland Family

John with his Father

John with his Father

Above is a photo of John landing an airplane in Granny’s back yard.

John as a baby

John as a baby

Little Baby John

Harriett and Baby Susan

Harriett and Baby Susan

Aunt Harriett with her Niece Susan

Earl Page (Ray's brother) and Margaret Kelley in NY during WWII.

Earl Page (Ray’s brother) and Margaret Kelley in NY during WWII.

Margaret Kelley studied at Columbia University in NY for her Master’s Degree. While she was there, Earl Page stopped (either coming or going) during WWII. It looks like they are at the Empire State Building in NYC.

pages and morelands
Two Kelley sisters, Harriett and Patricia with their husbands Raymond and Virgil.

Harriett with John

Harriett with John

John with his Everloving Aunt Harriett

Scandal at The Willows Maternity Sanitarium when Singer Borrows Baby to Defraud ex-Hubby

I was born and adopted from The Willows Maternity Sanitarium in Kansas City, Missouri. During its heyday, the Willows advertised “Superior Babies for Adoption”. After searching for newspaper articles that made reference to The Willows, I came across a scandal that involved The Willows in 1924. (If you would like more background information on The Willows, please see my earlier posts)

The Willows Maternity Sanitarium, Kansas City, Missouri

The Willows Maternity Sanitarium, Kansas City, Missouri

Miss Lydia Locke appeared at the Willows Maternity Hospital in 1924 calling herself Mrs. Ira Johnson of Hannibal, Missouri. She had references in place and the Willows was satisfied enough with her story that she left with a newborn baby boy. Miss Locke allegedly “borrowed” that baby in order to receive an additional sum from her wealthy ex-husband, Arthur Hudson Marks. In the divorce decree she received $100,000 but was assured an additional $300,000 in case a child was born to her. (the amounts varied depending on the newspaper) She obtained a birth certificate from the family physician naming the baby boy “Arthur Hudson Marks, Jr.”

The Marks were divorced in September of 1923. Apparently Miss Locke was mathematically challenged or unaware of the average gestational period for humans, but in October of 1924 she appeared in New York with the baby. Miss Locke contacted her ex-husband and asked him to acknowledge the baby as his own.

Mr. Marks, not so biologically or mathematically challenged as Miss Locke, employed private detectives to learn how she obtained the baby. The poor little baby, now six weeks old, was ordered returned to the Willows Maternity Sanitarium. The articles don’t say what became of the infant. In any event, he was better off without the looney Miss Locke.

locke-nov8-1925-color
bride

palm off baby

Date:  Tuesday, Nov. 11, 1924  Paper:  Boston Herald (Boston, MA)

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 11, 1924 Paper: Boston Herald (Boston, MA)

Before adoption became a compassionate process of placing children in healthy homes, it was more like the dog pound. Below is a clipping from 1906 for “The Willows” that reads like a “free to a good home” pet adoption ad.
free to a good home

Break Time. Let’s Check Out Old Articles About Death!

coroner toe

Reading old newspapers online is what I call great entertainment.  Our newspapers now are very cautious about what they print due to our litigious society.  The old newspapers were more like our modern day “Globe” or “Enquirer”, with the exception that Photo Shop hadn’t been invented yet.

The article below wouldn’t have made the newspaper now because no coroner would want to be labeled this inept.

Date: Thursday, June 15, 1911  Paper: Beaumont Enterprise (Beaumont, TX)

Date: Thursday, June 15, 1911 Paper: Beaumont Enterprise (Beaumont, TX)

Below is a bizarre rhyming obituary for a baby. Would any newspaper now print that little Jerry died from dysentery? Or old man Fancher died from cancer? There have been some improvements in the press.

rhyming obit

Date: Friday, August 18, 1871 Paper: Jamestown Journal (Jamestown, NY)

Pic of Mom & Dad in Matilda Loney's Wedding Album

Pic of Mom and Dad in Matilda Loney’s Wedding Album

The following would be a cheery addition to the “Weddings” section of the paper.

Date: Monday, March 27, 1893 Paper: New York Herald-Tribune (New York, NY)

Date: Monday, March 27, 1893 Paper: New York Herald-Tribune (New York, NY)

Below is An Honest Obituary from 1916.

Date: Monday, Sept. 25, 1916 Paper: Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC)

Date: Monday, Sept. 25, 1916 Paper: Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC)

And finally, some very unusual causes of death found in various old newspapers.

Date: Monday, August 22, 1904  Paper: Daily People (New York, NY)

Date: Monday, August 22, 1904 Paper: Daily People (New York, NY)

Date:  Monday, Dec. 29, 1884  Paper:  New York Herald-Tribune (New York, NY)

Date: Monday, Dec. 29, 1884 Paper: New York Herald-Tribune (New York, NY)

Date:  Thursday, April 2, 1914  Paper: New York World (New York, NY)

Date: Thursday, April 2, 1914 Paper: New York World (New York, NY)

tweets

3rd Great Grandfather Chester Lamb, Boss Tweed and Tammany Hall

Since it is almost election day, I’ll thought I’d post something political that happened in 1875.

This postcard has nothing to do with 1875, but it was mailed in 1907.  I found it today at our local Andover Antique Mall.  There is an incredible stall at the antique mall that is filled with postcards, old “Life” magazines & other historical paper items.

“Vote for Mugs”, mailed in 1907

My 3rd Great Grandfather Chester Lamb got caught up in Boss Tweed’s Tammany Hall escapades.

Chester Lamb (1816 – 1891)
is your 3rd great grandfather

William George Lamb (1842 – 1898)
Son of Chester

William Chester Lamb (1878 – 1946)
Son of William George

Florence Adele Lamb (1903 – 1984)
Daughter of William Chester

Grace Adele Britt (1928 – 1975)
Daughter of Florence Adele

Janet K. Page (aka Ellen Britt)
You are the daughter of Grace Adele

The following is an article from the “New York Daily Tribune“, Wednesday, December 8, 1875.  Chester Lamb was also before the Grand Jury and closely questioned for providing carriages for the Tweed Party’s escape.  Chester Lamb had a livery stable in New York City.  (please see earlier posts about dear Grandfather Chester)

The following is a quote from “Wikipedia” regarding Tammany Hall —

Tweed regime
Main article: William M. Tweed

Tammany’s control over the politics of New York City tightened considerably under Tweed. In 1858, Tweed utilized the efforts of Republican reformers to rein in the Democratic city government to obtain a position on the County Board of Supervisors (which he then used as a springboard to other appointments) and to have his friends placed in various offices. From this position of strength, he was elected “Grand Sachem” of Tammany, which he then used to take functional control of the city government. With his proteges elected governor of the state and mayor of the city, Tweed was able to expand the corruption and kickbacks of his “Ring” into practically every aspect of city and state governance. Although Tweed was elected to the State Senate, his true sources of power were his appointed positions to various branches of the city government. These positions gave him access to city funds and contractors, thereby controlling public works programs. This benefitted his pocketbook and those of his friends, but also provided jobs for the immigrants, especially Irish laborers, who were the electoral base of Tammany’s power.[26]

Under “Boss” Tweed’s dominance, the city expanded into the Upper East and Upper West Sides of Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge was begun, land was set aside for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, orphanages and almshouses were constructed, and social services – both directly provided by the state and indirectly funded by state appropriations to private charities – expanded to unprecedented levels. All of this activity, of course, also brought great wealth to Tweed and his friends. It also brought them into contact and alliance with the rich elite of the city, who either fell in with the graft and corruption, or else tolerated it because of Tammany’s ability to control the immigrant population, of whom the “uppertens” of the city were wary.

It was therefore Tammany’s demonstrated inability to control Irish laborers in the Orange riot of 1871 that began Tweed’s downfall. Campaigns to topple Tweed by the New York Times and Thomas Nast of Harper’s Weekly began to gain traction in the aftermath of the riot, and disgruntled insiders began to leak the details of the extent and scope of the Tweed Ring’s avarice to the newspapers.

Tweed was arrested and tried in 1872. He died in Ludlow Street Jail, and political reformers took over the city and state governments.[26] Following Tweed’s arrest, Tammany survived but was no longer controlled by just Protestants and was now dependent on leadership from bosses of Irish descent.[19]

William Wallace and Margaret Brinkerhoff Wallace

One of my brick walls is finding out what ever happened to William Wallace.  William is my biological 4th great grandfather.

William Wallace (1779 – 1848)
is your 4th great grandfather
Elizabeth W. Wallace (1828-1899)
Daughter of William
Mary Ella Lewis (1851-1928)
Daughter of Elizabeth W.
William Chester Lamb (1878-1946)
Son of Mary Ella
Florence Adele Lamb (1903-1984)
Daughter of William Chester
Grace Adele Britt (1928-1975)
Daughter of Florence Adele
Janet K. Page (aka Ellen Britt)

You are the daughter of Grace Adele

William Wallace and Margaret Brinkerhoff were married July 26, 1801 at the Trinity Episcopal Church (Wall Street), New York City.

Trinity Church
74 Trinity Pl
New York, NY 10006
(212) 602-0800

Their records are searchable online.   http://www.trinitywallstreet.org/history/registers

I found the date of William Wallace and Margaret Brinkerhoff’s marriage.

Husband Name: Wallace, William
Date: 07/26/1801
Church Reported: Trinity
Minister: Moore, Benjamin
Wife Name: Brinckerhoff, Margaret

Gosh — wonder if Benjamin Moore had a paint factory as well as being an Episcopalian minister?

William and Margaret had two of their children baptized on January 18, 1804 at the Broadway and Seventy First Street Christ Episcopal Church, New York, New York.  William Henry Wallace (born 17 August 1803) and Jane Ann Wallace (born 18 January 1804) were baptized that day.

I’ve found Margaret’s obituary but not William’s.  I found a 1850 census listing Margaret Wallace living with daughter & son-in-law, so I suspect that William had died by that point.  For the first time in the history of the United States census, the census workers of the 1850 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses.

While searching on the free ancestry search site  http://www.familysearch.org   I found a William Wallace that meets the description that I had been searching for.  He was born in Albany, NY in 1779.  He died before the 1850 census — this one died on February 21, 1848.  But — as I looked at the film, I saw that he died of Typhoid Fever and was buried in Potter’s Field.  Because I knew that William Wallace was a staunch Episcopalian and had a family, I immediately discounted this record because I knew he wouldn’t have been buried in a Potter’s Field.

BUT — today I was reading a book titled “The Graveyard Shift, a Family Historian’s Guide to New York City Cemeteries”, writted by Carolee Inskeep.

In her introduction (page xiv) she writes,

“Please keep an open mind about where your ancestors are buried.  New Yorkers turn up in the least expected places.  Some wealthy New Yorkers are buried in the “potter’s field” because they died of contagious disease.”

Perhaps this is William Wallace, especially if he did die of Typhoid Fever.  I have also found records where Margaret Wallace was baptized as an adult in the Baptist Church, in the Hudson River.  Her love of the Baptist Church is mentioned in her obituary.  Perhaps she never got comfortable with William’s Episcopalian ways.

From the “New York Herald, NY, NY” on Monday, January 14, 1861

Our Country Divided — The Civil War (Not the 2012 Presidential Election)

On the Britt side of my family, I had the Confederates. On the Dickinson side, I had the Union Soldiers.

John W. Dickinson (1843 – 1916)
is your 2nd great grandfather
Mary Emma Dickinson (1877 – 1919)
Daughter of John W.
Florence Adele Lamb (1903 – 1984)
Daughter of Mary Emma
Grace Adele Britt (1928 – 1975)
Daughter of Florence Adele
Janet K. Page (aka Ellen Britt)
You are the daughter of Grace Adele

John W. Dickinson was born at Oyster Bay, NY in 1843. John W. married Emma Woodruff, who was born in Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey in about 1847. He enlisted in the war originally on May 6, 1861 and then reenlisted on August 22, 1862. From September 28 of 1864 until June 19, 1865 (when he mustered out) he was in the hospital. Part of the time he was in Ward U.S.A. General Hospital, Newark, NJ. The records don’t say if he was injured or sick — many of the men caught communicable diseases like typhoid, Camp Fever, dysentery or tuberculosis.

 

 

 

John H. Dickinson, My 3rd Great Maternal Grandfather

John H. Dickinson was the Coroner of the City of Williamsburg, NY. It is such a coincidence that my daughter and her family live in Williamsburg, which is now part of Brooklyn, NY. We’ve gone a full cycle back to our genealogical roots. Unfortunately for John H., he died in his 40th year of age.

John H. Dickinson married Mary Weeks. They had seven children and all died in infancy or unmarried except two, Anne, Born 1839 who married H.M. Funston, and John W. Dickinson who married Emma Woodruff and had four children. I am here because of John W. Dickinson — but more about him later.

John H. Dickinson (1816 – 1853)
is your 3rd great grandfather

John W. Dickinson (1843 – 1916)
Son of John H.

Mary Emma Dickinson (1877 – 1919)
Daughter of John W.

Florence Adele Lamb (1903 – 1984)
Daughter of Mary Emma

Grace Adele Britt (1928 – 1975)
Daughter of Florence Adele

Janet K. Page (aka Ellen Britt)
You are the daughter of Grace Adele

Below is John H. Dickinson’s Obituary. They took his body back to Oyster Bay, NY on some kind of wagon with horses. I imagine he wasn’t in the best shape upon arrival.

John H. Dickinson graduated from Columbia School of Medicine. I emailed Columbia University and received the following documents — they are difficult to see, but say that John Dickinson has been a student of medicine for three years and is of good moral character and is over twenty one years. (no Doogie Howser, my John H. Dickinson)

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