Tag Archives: political incorrectness

Three of My Relatives Have Been Shot to Death

Before I get started, I need to say that these three died in the years 1922, 1935 and 1948.  And that I didn’t know them.  I only discovered how they died by reading newspaper clippings and ordering copies of their death certificates while researching my family tree.

Music to be Murdered by

Music to be Murdered by

To get into the mood for this post, I suggest you click on the link below and listen to Alfred Hitchcock’s album, “Music to be Murdered by”.

http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Music_to_be_Murdered_By_%28Imperial,_LP-9052,_1958%29#Tracks

Don’t worry — this is a free site. Once you are on the site, click on the audio button and you can hear the entire album, once again, for free. Below is a list of the tracks, and I must add that it is quite humorous. But, I have a macabre sense of humor. Like they say, “what doesn’t kill you only postpones the inevitable”.

1. I’ll Never Smile Again
2. I Don’t Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You
3. After You’ve Gone
4. Alfred Hitchcock Television Theme
5. Suspicion
6. Body and Soul
7. Lover Come Back to Me
8. I’ll Walk Alone
9. The Hour of Parting

I’ve already written about Olivette Engle in an earlier post dated February 25, 2013. She was shot to death by her deranged husband who had been gassed during World War I. The cause of death on her death certificate is “perforating bullet, wound of chest and skull”. Olivette is from my paternal side of the family.

The other two ancestors who were killed were Roy Britt and his brother William C. Britt. The Britt brothers were the sons of John Franklin Britt and Margaret Jane Strain Britt of Eufaula, Alabama. And brothers to my maternal grandfather, John Mansel Britt. Roy was born in 1892 and William was born in 1894. Both had served in WWI just like Olivette Engle’s deranged husband. Roy and William are from my maternal side of the family.

These three Britt boys must have been quite the characters in Eufaula. My grandfather and Roy both left Alabama to work in New Jersey during and after WWI. John Mansel and Roy married girls from New Jersey, but ended up returning to Alabama without their wives. They never got divorced, but they also never got back together with their wives. As far as I can tell, William C. Britt never married.

I can only guess that the brothers had some status in Alabama and could rely on their father’s name whereas New Jersey was probably a very foreign environment. They ditched the North and returned to the South. Eufaula is a lovely town with beautiful antebellum homes and a nice slow pace.

William was killed first in 1935. I am going to post a newspaper clipping about his death, but first I need to add a disclaimer. It was written in the South in 1935 and I apologize for the article’s racist tone.

Date: Sept. 21, 1935  Newspaper: Anniston Star, Anniston, Alabama

Date: Sept. 21, 1935 Newspaper: Anniston Star, Anniston, Alabama

I don’t know where William’s gas station was in Eufaula, AL, but the photo above is an actual abandoned filling station in Eufaula. I found this photo in the Library of Congress Archives, and to give credit where credit is due, the web connection to this print is http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.08369

Roy was killed in 1948. He had lived in New Jersey for a short time and married Melda Zitzner. Melda Z. Britt stayed on in New Jersey and died in 1986. She never remarried even though Roy died years before.

Date:  July 10, 1948  Newspaper:  Anniston Star, Anniston, Alabama

Date: July 10, 1948 Newspaper: Anniston Star, Anniston, Alabama

December 1935. "Coca-Cola shack in Alabama." Photograph by Walker Evans.  http://www.shorpy.com/node/140

December 1935. “Coca-Cola shack in Alabama.” Photograph by Walker Evans. http://www.shorpy.com/node/140

I haven’t found out why Roy got into an argument or why it lead to his murder. But I have found some interesting information about soft drinks and the South.

The article below is copied from the Wikipedia article, “The Culture of the South”.

Drink

Many of the most popular American soft drinks today originated in the South (Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, Mountain Dew, Big Red, Royal Crown Cola and its related Nehi products and Dr Pepper). In many parts of Oklahoma, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Texas and other parts of the South, the term “soft drink” or “soda” is discarded in favor of “Coke”. Some people use the term “co-cola” when ordering a soft drink. In most restaurants, when someone orders “coke” or “co-cola”, it is understood to bring whatever brand of cola the establishment offers.

3rd Great Grandfather Chester Lamb, Boss Tweed and Tammany Hall

Since it is almost election day, I’ll thought I’d post something political that happened in 1875.

This postcard has nothing to do with 1875, but it was mailed in 1907.  I found it today at our local Andover Antique Mall.  There is an incredible stall at the antique mall that is filled with postcards, old “Life” magazines & other historical paper items.

“Vote for Mugs”, mailed in 1907

My 3rd Great Grandfather Chester Lamb got caught up in Boss Tweed’s Tammany Hall escapades.

Chester Lamb (1816 – 1891)
is your 3rd great grandfather

William George Lamb (1842 – 1898)
Son of Chester

William Chester Lamb (1878 – 1946)
Son of William George

Florence Adele Lamb (1903 – 1984)
Daughter of William Chester

Grace Adele Britt (1928 – 1975)
Daughter of Florence Adele

Janet K. Page (aka Ellen Britt)
You are the daughter of Grace Adele

The following is an article from the “New York Daily Tribune“, Wednesday, December 8, 1875.  Chester Lamb was also before the Grand Jury and closely questioned for providing carriages for the Tweed Party’s escape.  Chester Lamb had a livery stable in New York City.  (please see earlier posts about dear Grandfather Chester)

The following is a quote from “Wikipedia” regarding Tammany Hall —

Tweed regime
Main article: William M. Tweed

Tammany’s control over the politics of New York City tightened considerably under Tweed. In 1858, Tweed utilized the efforts of Republican reformers to rein in the Democratic city government to obtain a position on the County Board of Supervisors (which he then used as a springboard to other appointments) and to have his friends placed in various offices. From this position of strength, he was elected “Grand Sachem” of Tammany, which he then used to take functional control of the city government. With his proteges elected governor of the state and mayor of the city, Tweed was able to expand the corruption and kickbacks of his “Ring” into practically every aspect of city and state governance. Although Tweed was elected to the State Senate, his true sources of power were his appointed positions to various branches of the city government. These positions gave him access to city funds and contractors, thereby controlling public works programs. This benefitted his pocketbook and those of his friends, but also provided jobs for the immigrants, especially Irish laborers, who were the electoral base of Tammany’s power.[26]

Under “Boss” Tweed’s dominance, the city expanded into the Upper East and Upper West Sides of Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge was begun, land was set aside for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, orphanages and almshouses were constructed, and social services – both directly provided by the state and indirectly funded by state appropriations to private charities – expanded to unprecedented levels. All of this activity, of course, also brought great wealth to Tweed and his friends. It also brought them into contact and alliance with the rich elite of the city, who either fell in with the graft and corruption, or else tolerated it because of Tammany’s ability to control the immigrant population, of whom the “uppertens” of the city were wary.

It was therefore Tammany’s demonstrated inability to control Irish laborers in the Orange riot of 1871 that began Tweed’s downfall. Campaigns to topple Tweed by the New York Times and Thomas Nast of Harper’s Weekly began to gain traction in the aftermath of the riot, and disgruntled insiders began to leak the details of the extent and scope of the Tweed Ring’s avarice to the newspapers.

Tweed was arrested and tried in 1872. He died in Ludlow Street Jail, and political reformers took over the city and state governments.[26] Following Tweed’s arrest, Tammany survived but was no longer controlled by just Protestants and was now dependent on leadership from bosses of Irish descent.[19]

Gutter Snipe or Royal Offspring?

text on the back of the card reads (I apologize for the political incorrectness of the times)

As bends the sapling, so grows the giant oak.

‘Tis not the reversal of species, but the development of species the forester seeks and attains.

Pride not yourself that you are better than your humble neighbor, the untutored lout, or the depraved Apache. Rather thank the fates that fortune favored you in your education and training during the formative years.

If the royal offspring falls into the hands of the depraved at birth and the child of the gutter occupies the royal cradle, then the royal one is educated a “gutter snipe” and the humble blood grows a prince.”

Posts About Dead Relatives

All Gene Pools Need Chlorine

Your Genetic Genealogist

All Gene Pools Need Chlorine

Unclaimed Ancestors

Connecting old photos with the families searching for them.

notsofancynancy

How the hell did I get here?

V.L. Brunskill

writer, reunited adoptee, former music journalist

Ephemeral New York

Chronicling an ever-changing city through faded and forgotten artifacts

Posts About Dead Relatives

All Gene Pools Need Chlorine

Chips Off the Old Block

A blog devoted to genealogical wanderings - dedicated to family near and far, through distance and time

openSNP

crowdsourcing genome wide association studies